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All about anal fissure causes of anal fissure symptoms of anal fissure treatment for anal fissure prevention of anal fissure Articles in anal and rectal disorders - anal fissure anal itching anorectal abscess ostomy pilonidal disease proctitis rectal prolapse imperforate anus hemorrhoids

What is an anal fissure?

An anal fissure is a tear in the internal lining of the anus. This area is called the anal mucosa. This break in the anal lining often reopens during bowel movements. The result is bright red blood and intense pain. An anal fissure is a tear in the bowel lining. It causes painful, bloody bowel movements. It is often confused with hemorrhoids, which are painful swellings at the anus caused by enlarged veins. A fissure can be acute or chronic. The chronic condition is often associated with a buildup of tissue at the external end of the tear. This is called a sentinel pile and may be noticed by an affected person. The internal end may also have a buildup of tissue that an affected person can rarely see. When a fissure is present, the mucosa of the anus opens each time it is stretched to allow for a bowel movement. This continual opening prevents healing. It can also leave scar tissue. Most chronic fissures are in the center of the back of the anus. The anal sphincter muscles need to relax for a person to have a bowel movement. A person with a fissure may have muscles that are too tight. This makes bowel movements painful.

More information on anal fissure

What is an anal fissure? - An anal fissure is a tear in the internal lining of the anus. This break in the anal lining often reopens during bowel movements. An anal fissure is a tear in the bowel lining.
What causes an anal fissure? - A hard, dry bowel movement can cause a tear in the anal lining, resulting in a fissure. Other causes of a fissure include diarrhea and inflammation of the anorectal area.
What're the symptoms of anal fissure? - The most common symptoms of anal fissure are pain during and after a bowel movement. Because bowel movements are painful, many people complain of constipation.
What is the treatment for an anal fissure? - Treatment of an anal fissure depends on how long the fissure has been present. Acute fissures can be managed with a bulk-forming laxative.
What can be done to prevent an anal fissure? - Anal fissures can be prevented by maintaining regularly formed bowel movements. High fiber diets and stool softeners are often beneficial. 
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