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All about hemorrhoids external hemorrhoids internal hemorrhoids causes of hemorrhoids complications of hemorrhoids symptoms of hemorrhoids diagnosis of hemorrhoids hemorrhoids treatment hemorrhoids medications hemorrhoids relief hemorrhoids surgery rubber band ligation alternative treatment for hemorrhoids prevention of hemorrhoids hemorrhoids during pregnancy Articles in anal and rectal disorders - anal fissure anal itching anorectal abscess ostomy pilonidal disease proctitis rectal prolapse imperforate anus hemorrhoids

What are hemorrhoids?

Hemorrhoids, often called piles, are clusters of veins in the anus, just under the membrane that lines the lowest part of the rectum and anus. They occur when veins in your rectum enlarge from straining or pressure. Hemorrhoids are varicose (swollen or dilated) veins located in or around the anus. Internal hemorrhoids are varicose veins that surround the rectum

and, when dilated, protrude inside, sometimes extending out of the anus.

Hemorrhoids are dilated (enlarged) veins which occur in and around the anus and rectum. They may be external (outside the anus) or internal and slip to the outside. In both of these instances, the hemorrhoids can be felt and seen as lumps or knots. Hemorrhoids also may remain inside the rectum and so cannot be felt or seen. These are called internal hemorrhoids. Hemorrhoids occur when the veins in the rectum or anus become enlarged; they may eventually bleed. Hemorrhoids may also become inflamed or may develop a blood clot (thrombus). Hemorrhoids that form above the boundary between the rectum and anus (anorectal junction) are called internal hemorrhoids; those that form below the anorectal junction are called external hemorrhoids. Both internal and external hemorrhoids may remain in the anus or protrude outside the anus.

Humans are prone to hemorrhoids because erect posture puts a lot of pressure on the veins in the anal region. Heredity has also been considered a factor, since hemorrhoids tend to run in families. Heredity has also been considered a factor, since hemorrhoids tend to run in families. Chronic constipation is considered a major cause of hemorrhoids. This is because constipated individuals tend to consistently strain to evacuate their bowels, increasing pressure in the rectum. Disturbance from frequent bowel movements associated with diarrhea can also be a cause. Additionally, frequent use of laxative may result in diarrhea, and increase your likelihood of getting hemorrhoids. Increased pressure in the veins of the anorectal area leads to hemorrhoids. This pressure may result from pregnancy, from frequent heavy lifting, or from repeated straining during bowel movements (defecation). Constipation may contribute to straining. In a few people, hemorrhoids develop from increased blood pressure in the portal vein. A doctor can distinguish the dilated, twisted veins that occur in this condition from common hemorrhoids.

More information on hemorrhoids

What are hemorrhoids? - Hemorrhoids are clusters of veins in the anus, just under the membrane that lines the lowest part of the rectum and anus.
What are external hemorrhoids? - External hemorrhoids are those that occur outside of the anal verge. External hemorrhoids are often fairly painful.
What are internal hemorrhoids? - Internal hemorrhoids are those that occur inside the rectum. Untreated internal hemorrhoids can lead to two severe forms of hemorrhoids: prolapsed and strangulated hemorrhoids.
What causes hemorrhoids? - The causes of hemorrhoids include genetic predisposition, excessive time and straining during bowel movements, and chronic bowel straining.
What are the complications of hemorrhoids? - Hemorrhoids can produce several uncomfortable, but non-serious problems. Hemorrhoids can ooze fresh red blood.
What are the symptoms of hemorrhoids? - Symptoms of hemorrhoids include fissures, fistulae, abscesses, or irritation and itching. Hemorrhoids can bleed after a bowel movement.
How are hemorrhoids diagnosed? - Diagnosis of hemorrhoids begins with a visual examination of the anus, followed by an internal examination.
What're the treatments for hemorrhoids? - Treatment of hemorrhoids varies depending on where they are, what problems they are causing, and how serious they are.
What hemorrhoids medications are available? - Local anesthetics temporarily relieve the pain, burning, and itching. Antiseptics inhibit the growth of bacteria and other organisms.
How to relieve hemorrhoids symptoms? - Hemorrhoids can often be effectively dealt with by dietary and lifestyle changes. Exercising, losing excess weight also helps.
What is the hemorrhoids surgery? - Surgery to remove the hemorrhoids may be used if other treatments fail. Rubber band ligation can be used to treat internal hemorrhoids.
What is rubber band ligation? - Rubber band ligation is an outpatient treatment for second-degree internal hemorrhoids. Rubber band ligation is a popular procedure.
What is the alternative treatment for hemorrhoids? - To prevent hemorrhoids by strengthening the veins of the anus, rectum, and colon, they recommend blackberries, blueberries, cherries, vitamin C.
How to prevent hemorrhoids? - Prevention of hemorrhoids includes drinking more fluids, eating more fiber, exercising, practicing better posture, and reducing bowel movement strain and time.
Hemorrhoids during pregnancy - Constipation combined with the increased pressure on the rectum and perineum is the primary reason that pregnant women experience hemorrhoids. 
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