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All about irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) causes of irritable bowel syndrome risk factors for irritable bowel syndrome irritable bowel syndrome symptoms diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome treatment for irritable bowel syndrome irritable bowel syndrome diet medications to cure irritable bowel syndrome stress management for irritable bowel syndrome

What medications are available to cure irritable bowel syndrome?

There is no cure for IBS. However, if the patient is having bad symptoms, the doctor may prescribe medicine to help manage them or make them less severe. Antispasmodic medicines, such as dicyclomine (Bemote, Bentyl, Di-Spaz) and hyoscyamine (Levsin, Levbid, NuLev), are sometimes used to treat symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome. Antidiarrheal medicines, such as loperamide (Imodium), a kaolin/pectin preparation (Kaopectate), and diphenoxylate/atropine (Lomotil), are sometimes used when diarrhea is a major feature of IBS. Do not take these on a long-term basis without first consulting a doctor. Antidepressants may be very effective in smaller doses than those typically used to treat depression. Imipramine (Tofranil), amitriptyline (Elavil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), and desipramine (Norpramin) are some commonly used medicines that may alleviate irritable bowel syndrome symptoms. Tegaserod (Zelnorm) is used for the short-term treatment of women with irritable bowel syndrome when constipation is the main symptom. Alosetron (Lotronex) is approved only for short-term treatment of women with severe, chronic, diarrhea-predominant IBS who have failed to respond to conventional IBS therapy. 5-hydroxytriptamine (5-HT or serotonin) is a neurotransmitter that stimulates several different receptors on nerves in the intestine, including one called the 5-HT4 receptor. Stimulation of these receptors by 5-HT increases muscle contractions in the colon.

More information on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

What is irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)? - Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a intestinal condition characterized by abdominal pain and cramps, changes in bowel movements, gassiness, bloating, nausea, and other symptoms.
What causes irritable bowel syndrome? - An abnormality in digestion and propulsion process cause irritable bowel syndrome. Nerve-signalling chemicals, particularly serotonin, and stress appear to have an important role.
What're the risk factors for irritable bowel syndrome? - Stress stimulates colonic spasm in people with IBS. Female reproductive hormones are another trigger of irritable bowel syndrome.
What are the symptoms of IBS? - Symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome are abdominal pain or discomfort associated with changes in bowel habits in the absence of any structural abnormality.
How is irritable bowel syndrome diagnosed? - Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is diagnosed with colonoscopy, esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), abdominal ultrasound, blood tests.
What's the treatment for irritable bowel syndrome? - Treatment of irritable bowel syndrome can consist of dietary advice, stool softeners and laxatives in obstipation-predominant, and antidiarrheals (loperamide) in diarrhea-predominant IBS.
What irritable bowel syndrome diet is suggested? - Fiber supplementation may improve symptoms of constipation and diarrhea. Avoid food or beverages that make the symptoms worse.
What medications cure irritable bowel syndrome? - Antispasmodic medicines are used to treat symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome. Antidiarrheal medications are used when diarrhea is a major feature of IBS.
Stress management for irritable bowel syndrome - Situations such as family problems, work stress, exams, etc, may trigger symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in some people. 
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