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All about irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) causes of irritable bowel syndrome risk factors for irritable bowel syndrome irritable bowel syndrome symptoms diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome treatment for irritable bowel syndrome irritable bowel syndrome diet medications to cure irritable bowel syndrome stress management for irritable bowel syndrome

What're the risk factors for irritable bowel syndrome?

Eating causes contractions of the colon, normally causing an urge to have a bowel movement within 30 to 60 minutes after a meal. Fat in the diet can cause contractions of the colon following a meal. With IBS, however, the urge may come sooner, accompanied by cramps and diarrhea. Some kinds of food and drink appear to play a key role in triggering IBS attacks. Food and drink that healthy people can ingest without any trouble may disrupt peristalsis in IBS patients, which probably explains why IBS attacks often occur shortly after meals. Chocolate, milk products, caffeine (in coffee, tea, colas, and other drinks), and large quantities of alcohol are some of the chief culprits. Other kinds of food have also been identified as problems, however, and the pattern of what can and cannot be tolerated is different for each person. Characteristically, IBS symptoms rarely occur at night and disrupt the patient's sleep.

Stress stimulates colonic spasm in people with IBS. Although not completely understood, it is believed to be because the colon is partly controlled by the nervous system. Counseling and stress reduction techniques can help relieve the symptoms of IBS, however, this does not mean IBS is the result of a personality disorder. It is at least partly a disorder of colon motility. IBS symptoms sometimes intensify during menstruation, which suggests that female reproductive hormones are another trigger.


More information on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

What is irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)? - Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a intestinal condition characterized by abdominal pain and cramps, changes in bowel movements, gassiness, bloating, nausea, and other symptoms.
What causes irritable bowel syndrome? - An abnormality in digestion and propulsion process cause irritable bowel syndrome. Nerve-signalling chemicals, particularly serotonin, and stress appear to have an important role.
What're the risk factors for irritable bowel syndrome? - Stress stimulates colonic spasm in people with IBS. Female reproductive hormones are another trigger of irritable bowel syndrome.
What are the symptoms of IBS? - Symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome are abdominal pain or discomfort associated with changes in bowel habits in the absence of any structural abnormality.
How is irritable bowel syndrome diagnosed? - Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is diagnosed with colonoscopy, esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), abdominal ultrasound, blood tests.
What's the treatment for irritable bowel syndrome? - Treatment of irritable bowel syndrome can consist of dietary advice, stool softeners and laxatives in obstipation-predominant, and antidiarrheals (loperamide) in diarrhea-predominant IBS.
What irritable bowel syndrome diet is suggested? - Fiber supplementation may improve symptoms of constipation and diarrhea. Avoid food or beverages that make the symptoms worse.
What medications cure irritable bowel syndrome? - Antispasmodic medicines are used to treat symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome. Antidiarrheal medications are used when diarrhea is a major feature of IBS.
Stress management for irritable bowel syndrome - Situations such as family problems, work stress, exams, etc, may trigger symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in some people. 
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