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All about liver transplant candidate for liver transplant liver transplant donors liver transplant organ distribution and waiting list liver transplant procedure recovery from liver transplant surgery complications of liver transplantation medications for liver transplant Articles in liver diseases - cirrhosis of the liver hemochromatosis primary sclerosing cholangitis primary biliary cirrhosis alagille syndrome alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency Crigler-Najjar syndrome hepatitis fatty liver liver transplant Wilson's disease ascites cholestasis jaundice liver encephalopathy liver failure portal hypertension

How are transplanted organs allocated?

The United Network for Organ Sharing is responsible for transplant organ distribution in the United States. UNOS oversees the allocation of many different types of transplants, including liver, kidney, pancreas, heart, lung, and cornea.

UNOS receives data from hospitals and medical centers throughout the country regarding adults and children who need organ transplants. The medical team is responsible for sending the data to UNOS, and updating them as your condition changes.

Criteria have been developed to ensure that all people on the waiting list are judged fairly as to the severity of their illness and the urgency of receiving a transplant. Once UNOS receives the data from local hospitals, people waiting for a transplant are placed on a waiting list and given a "status" code. The people in most urgent need of a transplant are placed highest on the status list and are given first priority when a donor liver becomes available.

When a donor organ becomes available, a computer searches all the people on the waiting list for a liver and sets aside those who are not good matches for the available liver. A new list is made from the remaining candidates. The person at the top of the specialized list is considered for the transplant. If he/she is not a good candidate, for whatever reason, the next person is considered, and so forth. Some reasons that people lower on the list might be considered before a person at the top include the size of the donor organ and the distance between the donor and the recipient.

More information on liver transplant

What is a liver transplant? - Liver transplant is a surgical procedure performed to replace a diseased liver with a healthy liver from another person. An entire liver may be transplanted, or just a section.
Who is a candidate for a liver transplant? - To determine who is in the most critical need of a liver transplant, the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) uses a system.
Where do donated livers come from? - Liver donors are usually persons who have died and whose families have consented to having their organ donated.
How are transplanted organs allocated? - The United Network for Organ Sharing is responsible for transplant organ distribution in the United States.
How is liver transplant surgery performed? - There are three types of liver transplantation methods. They're orthotopic transplantation, heterotopic transplantation, and reduced-size liver transplants.
How to recover from liver transplant surgery? - Patients with transplanted livers have to stay on immunosuppressant drugs for the rest of their lives to prevent organ rejection.
What're the complications of liver transplantation? - There are several complications that can affect a recipient of a liver transplant. Major bleeding is common after transplantation.
What medications are used for liver transplant? - Liver transplant recipients are prescribed immunosuppressive medications to prevent rejection and antibiotics to prevent infections. 
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