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All about liver transplant candidate for liver transplant liver transplant donors liver transplant organ distribution and waiting list liver transplant procedure recovery from liver transplant surgery complications of liver transplantation medications for liver transplant Articles in liver diseases - cirrhosis of the liver hemochromatosis primary sclerosing cholangitis primary biliary cirrhosis alagille syndrome alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency Crigler-Najjar syndrome hepatitis fatty liver liver transplant Wilson's disease ascites cholestasis jaundice liver encephalopathy liver failure portal hypertension

What're the complications of liver transplantation?

There are several complications that can affect a recipient of a liver transplant. Some of these can occur right after the surgery and others can occur at any time for the rest of the person's life. Taking immunosuppressant medications makes a person more susceptible to infection. Major bleeding is common after transplantation because the new liver hasn't had enough time to make enough blood clotting proteins. Most liver transplant recipients need a blood transfusion along with their operation. Some may need a second operation within 24 to 48 hours to control major bleeding. Sometimes the major vessels that supply blood to the liver become blocked, or clot off. This can lead to sudden liver failure and the need for another liver transplant. Sometimes the connection between the bile duct and the intestine doesn't heal properly and bile leaks out. Or, sometimes scar tissue blocks the bile duct and bile is unable to flow. The body's normal response to a transplanted organ is to reject it. Even though they take medications to prevent rejection, most recipients will have one or more episodes of rejection. These are treated by increasing the dose of the medication or switching to a different medication. Cancer is another long-term problem with immunosuppressant medications. The most common cancers that develop are skin cancer and lymphoma, a cancer of the white blood cells.

More information on liver transplant

What is a liver transplant? - Liver transplant is a surgical procedure performed to replace a diseased liver with a healthy liver from another person. An entire liver may be transplanted, or just a section.
Who is a candidate for a liver transplant? - To determine who is in the most critical need of a liver transplant, the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) uses a system.
Where do donated livers come from? - Liver donors are usually persons who have died and whose families have consented to having their organ donated.
How are transplanted organs allocated? - The United Network for Organ Sharing is responsible for transplant organ distribution in the United States.
How is liver transplant surgery performed? - There are three types of liver transplantation methods. They're orthotopic transplantation, heterotopic transplantation, and reduced-size liver transplants.
How to recover from liver transplant surgery? - Patients with transplanted livers have to stay on immunosuppressant drugs for the rest of their lives to prevent organ rejection.
What're the complications of liver transplantation? - There are several complications that can affect a recipient of a liver transplant. Major bleeding is common after transplantation.
What medications are used for liver transplant? - Liver transplant recipients are prescribed immunosuppressive medications to prevent rejection and antibiotics to prevent infections. 
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